Practical takeaways at Campuskini workshop

Practical takeaways at Campuskini workshop

Practical takeaways at Campuskini workshop

A medical doctor, senior PR executives, NGO leaders and a tourism official praised a Campuskini workshop on “Getting Publicity and Press Release Writing” held yesterday and wanted it extended for two days from one day currently.

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How to make a story
newsworthy

Malaysia’s leading training company K-Pintar’s senior executive Julia Oh said the interesting and practical takeaways were: “How to make a story newsworthy; write short and interesting and attention grabbing headlines and introductory paragraphs; and, formatting of the press release that will attract editors.”

Oh said: “Media coach M Krishnamoorthy’s session from 9am to 5pm was interactive, inspiring, exciting and we did not feel that we were attending a learning session.

“He also taught us how to network with the media to get the press releases published.”

Another enthralling, captivating and inspiring session, according to Oh was when Malaysiakini’s editor-in-chief Steven Gan narrated how the leading online news portal started from scratch in 1999.

“It’s 17 years old and we have come a long way, starting from an Internet café to a four-storey building now. We had our ups and downs, but we stuck to the principle of reporting objectively and always attempting to give two sides of the story.

“We are glad the public continually support us and even contributed financially by raising funds through our Buy a Brick campaign,” Gan told participants when tracing the history of Malaysiakini.

He also gave a tour of the news portal’s office located near PJ Old Town.

Oh urged Malaysiakini to keep its class affordable, as it is now, so that more people can attend.

Part of Malaysiakini’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Programme

The workshop is part of Malaysiakini’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) programme that runs several media relations workshops, which charges only RM288 per person, and RM150 for students. The market rate for such one-day courses is about 10 times more, at an approximate cost of RM2,500.

Giving the participants
the confidence

A former New Straits Times and Malay Mail reporter, SK Thanusha Devi, now a marketing and communications executive at K-Pintar said: “I love this programme. Coming from a journalistic background, I was worried about how to angle press releases as a Marcomm person. Now, my doubts are cleared that we still have to write like how a journalist thinks so that our media statements are accepted by the editors, without having to burden them to rewrite or throw the press releases away.”

Thanusha thanked Gan and Krishnamoorthy for giving the participants the confidence on how to write effectively for the media, and to extend the training to a two-day session.

“Krishnamoorthy’s practical and hands-on sessions of writing and rewriting press releases on the screen were an easy an excellent process for us to learn.”

Women Aid Organisation’s communication officer Tan Heang-Lee said the practical exercises on writing and editing were helpful as Krishnamoorthy corrected them with the participants as a group.

Interactive
learning environment

An account executive, Fione Wong, said that session was an easy to understand and interactive learning environment.

“It provided a better understanding on how to write a press release with the right content to attract the editors in the media to use the material as news.”

Listening to the history of Malaysiakini by Gan was an eye-opener as to how it has continued to be independent.

“Krishnamoorthy corrected our press release drafts on the screen in a warm and friendly way making it easy for us to understand.”

Nurul Hazirah, an executive from Themed Attractions Resorts and Hotels, said she had gained knowledge on how to write from the media perspective and also from the public relations angle.

“It was a weekend well spent brushing up writing skills and it was indeed enlightening hearing Krishna’s experiences on how improve media relations.”

Two participants from Haluan, an NGO helping countries in famine and drought and social work in Malaysia, Khairul Azman and Mohd Nizar, said the workshop was useful in learning how to deliver the key message to the public when publicising an event.

“The facilities at Malaysiakini are good for training and Haluan would like to collaborate some of its projects with Malaysiakini,” Khairul said.

“Krishnamoorthy shared a lot of useful and practical insights on how to write a press release and get publicity in the media,”said Dr Paraman Subramaniam.

Universiti Malaya’s final year journalism student Zaim Aiman Ibrahim said he hoped Malaysiakini would organise more affordable writing courses like this for the public.

“Today’s class will help in enhancing my knowledge and experience on how to improve my writing skills,” Zaim Aiman said.

Standing At The Forefront of Technology

Standing At The Forefront of Technology

Standing At The Forefront of Technology

APU Organizes First Internet of Things (IoT) Innovation Day

Kuala Lumpur, 17 July 2017: The Asia Pacific University of Technology & Innovation (APU) recently organised its first Internet of Things (IoT) Innovation Day recently at its campus located at Technology Park Malaysia, Bukit Jalil.

This event was a part of APU Center for Research and Development of Internet of Things (CREDIT)’s efforts to expose students towards the potentials and development of IoT. CREDIT is the first Center of Excellence for IoT among Malaysian universities.

Dr Mazlan Abbas, CEO of FAVORIOT, Ober Choo, Technical Director of Cytron Technologies and James Lai, President of the Malaysia IoT Association (MyIoTA) were among guest speakers who delivered pocket talks on various IoT subject matters throughout the day.

In addition, the Malaysian Global Innovation & Creativity Centre (MaGIC) endorsed this event as part of its Road to the Global Entrepreneurship Community Summit 2017, a global summit initiated by the government of Malaysia to empower entrepreneurs around the world. MaGIC CEO, Ashran Dato’ Ghazi, officiated the event alongside Prof. Dr Ron Edwards, Vice Chancellor, APU and Prof. Dr Ir. Vinesh Thiruchelvam, Dean of Faculty of Computing, Engineering & Technology (FCET), APU.

With regards to the event, James Lai, as the President of MyIoTA, said, “With the dawn of the Fourth Industrial Revolution & IoT, it is timely & great to see the involvement of APU in organising such as an event that enables industry experts to share their knowledge on IoT. We hope to see more of such events in the future to nurture future talents in IoT & address the upcoming opportunities of 4IR”.

hen asked about the APU’s vision behind IoT and technology, Prof. Dr Ir. Vinesh Thiruchelvam, Dean of Faculty of Computing, Engineering & Technology (FCET), APU and Dr. Tan Chye Cheah, Vice President of CREDIT said,

“Soon, we will be moving towards the technological capabilities of having every device connected to the internet, in which data travels among one other and we can live in a more convenient way – big data and IoT play a major role in this, and we believe this is the future of technology – this is why we became the first university in Malaysia to run programmes specialized in IoT as well as big data, to address the vital needs of the market, in terms of talent supply.”

APU’s IoT Innovation saw participation from top IoT industry players, including MaGIC CEO, Ashran Dato’ Ghazi.

Panel discussions and dialogue sessions were held to expose students towards the development of IoT within Malaysia. From left: James Lai, President of Malaysia IoT Association (MyIoTA), Dr. Mazlan Abbas, CEO and Co-Founder of FAVORIOT, Ober Choo, Technical Director, Cytron Technologies Sdn Bhd and Muhammad Ehsan Rana, President of CREDIT, APU.

James Lai, President of MyIoTA, addressed the event as a move that is vital to nurture future talents in IoT and Industry Revolution 4.0.

APU’s first IoT Innovation Day received support from industry experts of the IoT field. From left: Dr. Mazlan Abbas, CEO and Co-Founder of FAVORIOT, Ober Choo, Technical Director, Cytron Technologies Sdn Bhd and Dr. Khoh Soo Beng, Research and Program Director (IoT Cluster), Collaborative Research in Engineering, Science and Technology (CREST).

About Asia Pacific University of Technology & Innovation (APU)

The Asia Pacific University of Technology & Innovation (APU) is amongst Malaysia’s Premier Private Universities. APU offers a wide range of degree programmes in collaboration with Staffordshire University, the UK with Technology. These programmes nurture students into professionals and prepare them for challenging careers and roles in business and society globally. Professionalism, problem-solving skills, and creativity & innovation are some of the key attributes of APU graduates. The multi-cultural student community comprises both Malaysian students as well as International students. APU has earned an enviable reputation as an award-winning University through its achievements in winning a host of prestigious awards at national and international levels. It was announced as among the Highest Rated Universities in Malaysia, being rated at TIER 5 (EXCELLENT) under the SETARA 2013 Ratings by the Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE) and Malaysian Qualifications Agency (MQA) on 1st November 2012.

For more information, please visit APU website

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For media enquiries, please contact:

Kok Cheng Mun
Student Services & Marketing Executive

Asia Pacific University of Technology & Innovation (APU)
E: chengmun@apu.edu.my | M: (+6) 016-9755 831

Exabytes Internet Marketing Summit is Back for 2017

Exabytes Internet Marketing Summit is Back for 2017

Exabytes Internet Marketing Summit is Back for 2017

KUALA LUMPUR – Exabytes Network Sdn Bhd, Malaysia’s leading website and e-commerce hosting provider, has announced that the Exabytes Internet Marketing Summit 2017 will be held on the 8th of August.

Started in year 2015, the Exabytes Internet Marketing Summit, or EIMS, is a momentous grand scale annual Internet Business event, which provides an effective platform and opportunities for knowledge sharing, intensive learning and networking among influential industry giants, branding and advertising specialists, freelance webmasters and more. EIMS aims to gather numerous experienced Digital Marketers and Gurus to provide insights on the current situations, strategies, as well as techniques and advancements related to the Digital Marketing Industry. At the same time, EIMS also provides on-the-spot consultations that would be highly valuable to digital marketers regardless of their industries or the scale of their businesses.

“For the past 2 years, numerous marketers, business owners and even professors from colleges and universities attended EIMS to gain directions for their companies, maximize exposure and build good network with other marketers and experts in the industry. It’s our honour to organize this event every single year since 2015. EIMS participants can expect to meet various world class marketers at the event and learn everything first hand,” the organizing chairperson, Mr Vickson Tan said in a statement

Among the topics that would be discussed at the annual digital marketing event are 10 Common Mistakes When Advertising on Google AdWords; Optimizing Your Email Marketing Funnel For Maximum Conversions; Building a Growth Stack : How to pioneer your customer funnel; How to Increase Your Landing Page Conversion Rate?; Don’t Go Viral For The Wrong Reasons; Satisfying a Hunger to Create and Share; The Ultimate SEO Trends & Algorithms and etc.

Keynote Speakers

Mellissa Lee

Head of GetResponse Malaysia

Kanika Agarwal

CEO & Founder of Passion Peers

Jerrick Yeoh

Marketing Manager Exabytes Digital

Ashley Ong

Regional Google Trainer, Google Partner Academy

Carol Fung

Manager of eCommerce Adoption & Ecosystem Upliftment, eCommerce Enablement Division, MDEC

Chan Kin Peng

Founding Partner of Kasatria Technologies

Junaida Orangzib

Manager of B40 Division, MDEC

Moderators & Panelists

Sunny Ooi

Co-founder & Managing Director of ClickAsia Malaysia and Singapore

Roger Wong

Head of Digital of Shock Media Studio

Jerrick Yeoh

Marketing Manager of Exabytes Digital

Joseph Goh

Founder/CEO of Jobbie

Chia Ting Ting

Company Director cum Head of Digital Content Marketing and Advertising Sales, FG Media/Malaysiakini

Aaron Lim

Managing Director & Founder of Goody Technologies

Greeno Sia

Co-founder of ViralCham-Rojaklah

Chan Kin Peng

Founding Partner of Kasatria Technologies

This event is going organize at MaGic Cyberjaya. Early-bird tickets with discounts for this event can currently be purchased at Exabytes website

Get your discount now

About The Organizer, The Exabytes Group

As one of the leading Web, Cloud and eCommerce Hosting Companies in Southeast Asia, Exabytes is in its 15th year of operation and specializes in providing web hosting services to small and medium sized businesses, individuals and SOHO. With deep understanding on the business requirements for online setup and E-Commerce, Exabytes offers the clients an end-to-end Web-hosting solution which is unmatched by its competitors ranging from Cloud hosting, eCommerce applications, marketing engine, and dedicated network systems and more.

Exabytes’ core business offerings include shared web-hosting, dedicated server hosting, reseller hosting, cloud hosting, SSL web certification, Virtual Private Servers (VPS), Content Delivery Network (CDN), server management, Google SEM (Search Engine Marketing), EBuzzzz Email/Voice/SMS, server co-location, domain registrations, website design, etc. Its commitments to customers cover 24x7x365 professional technical support, 100% Customer Satisfaction Guarantee, 100-Day Money Back, 99.9% Network Uptime and 99.5% Server Uptime Guarantee. For partner benefits and details of other promotions and products of the Exabytes Group of Companies,

Please visit Exabytes website

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More convenient to repay PTPTN loans now

More convenient to repay PTPTN loans now

More convenient to repay PTPTN loans now

In a bid to make the repayment of PTPTN loan more convenient, the National Higher Education Fund Corporation (PTPTN) has introduced loan repayments via online direct debit.

This is in addition to the existing repayment facilities that are already provided, including salary deduction, internet banking, FPX, MyPay and JomPay.

According to PTPTN, this initiative would not only speed up the loan repayment process, it is also more secured compared to making physical payments.

This repayment method has been introduced since 2 November 2016 through a partnership that PTPTN established with MyClear and Bank Islam.

Previously, borrowers had to manually apply for direct debit by filling up physical forms at PTPTN counters and risk having their applications rejected if any mistakes when fillup the form or difference in signatures were noticed.

Now, the application can be completed online and processed within 3 working days.

PTPTN also added that depositors of the National Education Savings Scheme (SSPN-i), can now use direct debit to deposit their savings aside from repaying their loans.

The advantages of direct debit

Borrowers who repay their PTPTN loans using the direct debit are also entitled to a 10% discount.

PTPTN says that direct debit ensures consistent repayment of PTPTN loans. Additionally, it also helps to avoid installment arrears and build a good track record in CCRIS.

This consistent payment will help borrowers to avoid legal action being taken against them for having outstanding debts.

If they do not want to their salaries deducted, direct debit is the best existing alternative loan repayment method that borrowers can opt for if they want to repay loans consistently every month.

Steps to applying for direct debit

Borrowers and depositors interested may proceed to apply for the facility by logging on to PTPTN’s official website at www.ptptn.gov.my.

The application process can be initiated in the ‘permohonan direct debit’ hyperlink located under the ‘perkhidmatan atas talian’ section.

Only one attempt is needed to apply for the direct debit facility. Once the application is completed, the monthly payment will be arranged between PTPTN and the bank of your choice.

The application procedure is also free of charge.

They must ensure that their bank account is active for the application. The payment amount for the loan should also exceed if not be equal to PTPTN’s monthly installment plan.  

This direct debit facility is currently available in the following banks:

Local Banks

International Banks

Borrowers who are facing financial difficulties and can’t afford loan repayment according to PTPTN’s monthly installment plan may contact PTPTN’s Careline at 03-2193 3000 to negotiate for a restructured monthly installment plan that would accommodate the borrower’s financial capabilities.

For more information

contact PTPTN at
03-2193 3000
or visit PTPTN’s website

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The Malaysian Education Dilemma

The Malaysian Education Dilemma

The Malaysian Education Dilemma

Malaysian teaching methods have changed little since the establishment of the Penang Free school in 1816, with students still sitting in classrooms with pencils and pads of paper, writing what teachers tell them to.

The stagnation of our teaching methods has led to the lack of innovation amongst students and teachers in the country.

The turn of the millennium has led to countless technological innovations. In the past 10 years, social, transportational, industrial, and administrative technologies have grown by leaps and bounds.

But for some reason, there has been no significant technological change in the teaching methods of Malaysian education in the past century. Education, seen to be one of the most important foundations of a developing country, has effectively been put on hold.

Studies have shown that technology and media can enhance early childhood practice when integrated into the environment, curriculum, and daily routines.

This is because the use of technology contributes to the stimulation of the brain during early childhood, making information easily understandable and entertaining.

The same study also found that technology is an effective tool for dual language learners because it provides features that allow students to practice secondary languages which they would otherwise not be able to do outside their classrooms. Useful in a bi-lingual society such as Malaysia.

The lack of development of the local education system becomes apparent when we compare ourselves to the advanced teaching technology that some Western European and Asian countries have been using for years.

Countries such as the Netherlands, have incorporated technology into their education system and since been ranked one of the top ten performing countries in science, math and reading scores.

South Korea, another country that topped the lists, incorporates projectors and electronic flashcards into all their public schools. Singapore, our neighbour and the country that took first place in the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) rankings, provides laptops for public school students.

Malaysia on the other hand, came in at a dismal 52 out of 76 ranked countries on the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development’s education quality list.

Another study focusing on mathematics and science showed Malaysia scoring 465 in mathematics and 471 in science. Other nations worldwide have scored an average of 500 points.

There have, of course, been attempts by the Malaysian government to bring local public schools into the 21st century, such as 1Bestari Net which aimed to provide 4G connectivity to 10,000 schools. However, the government contract, slated to run up a cost of RM4.077 billion over the course of 15 years, has since been described by the Public Accounts Committee to be “failed”.

Since then, private companies have been taking matters into their own hands and crafted their own education models designed for early childhood development. One of these companies is Eduspec.

In an age where digital literacy has become a mandatory job skill, Eduspec emphasizes on guiding early childhood educators and students in the use, integration, and evaluation of technology.

Eduspec has launched three main courses in Malaysia so far, computational thinking, robotics and coding for primary schoolers. The programs have been crafted with the consultation of experts on early childhood education from Carnegie Mellon University.

Has the Malaysian education system come to a point where we must rely on private companies to bring it into the future?

Blind; but doesn’t lose sight on the importance of education

Blind; but doesn’t lose sight on the importance of education

M'sia's first blind lawyer not losing sight of importance of education

Alyaa Alhadjri, 11 April 2017
He lost his vision at the age of four, but his father’s foresight on the importance of education eventually saw Mah Hassan Omar graduating and practising as Malaysia’s first visually impaired lawyer.

Born in Besut, Terengganu in 1961, at the age of seven, Mah Hassan was sent to pursue his primary education at Johor Bahru’s Princess Elizabeth special school for the blind – a train journey which even today would take up to 17 hours from Wakaf Baru in Kelantan, the nearest station to his hometown.

By the time he entered secondary school, Mah Hassan has integrated into the mainstream system where one or two visually impaired pupils will be placed in an ordinary classroom with other sighted students.

During an interview held at his law firm in Sentul, which is also the office for KL Braille Resources, Mah revealed how his father had fought societal norms and approached the Welfare Department for assistance to provide him with an education that would help him to lead an independent life.

The law graduate from Universiti Malaya went on to earn his master’s degree at Southampton University, United Kingdom, before returning home for a 13-year stint with the Kuala Lumpur Stock Exchange. In 2005, he left to set up his own law firm.

The early realisation that education is the key to assisting people with disabilities has shaped Mah Hassan to be an advocate for their rights to equal access to information – including pioneering a project to produce a braille version of the Quran.

At the age of 56, Mah Hassan is a father of six – three girls and three boys – the eldest three of whom are pursuing their higher education.

He has set many personal records and aims to inspire others like him.

Here is Mah Hassan’s story in his own words:

AS A YOUNG BOY, I WAS SO ENTHUSIASTIC TO GO TO SCHOOL. But for my parents, as I understood it, it was very challenging.

They had to face the reality of how to part with their blind boy. Also, the people and neighbours accused them of them being irresponsible.

My father told me every time I leave the house to go to school, he could not follow me. He always thought about what the people were saying.

My mother will send me because my mother is stronger in that sense.

FOR ALL PARENTS OUT THERE, I wish to urge all of you who have children with disabilities, give your children an education.

With education, you are giving him or her the important equipment to live independently.

You can give them as much money as you can afford but the money will go. If you give them education, it will stay with them forever.

IN ADDITION TO ACADEMIC SKILLS, I always see that primary education provided me with an important background, basic skills that prepared me to lead an independent life. In other words, being a blind person, we were taught how to groom and take care of ourselves. How to live independently.

For every blind child, I see survival skills as a very important factor. Because even with academic success, without the necessary guidance, from my observations it would be very difficult to survive in life.

COMPETITION WAS STIFFER DURING SECONDARY SCHOOL. I managed to continue until Form 6, before pursuing my degree in law at Universiti Malaya. As a matter of fact, I was the first blind person in the country to take up law.

When I was called to the bar in January 1989, again I created a Malaysian record as the first blind person in the country to get legal certification as an advocate and solicitor.

Why do I stress on the records? Because the greatest challenge for blind students is a lack of books.

I PRACTICALLY DID NOT HAVE ANY BOOKS AVAILABLE IN BRAILLE. So I had to double my efforts.

I spent the greatest part of my time in university to transcribe books into braille. During my school time, the blind at the time did not even have any copy of the Quran in braille.

The Quran is the basis for Islamic books so I think it is a denial of our right to have equal access to the Quran.

BESIDES STUDIES AND PROMOTING MY LEGAL PRACTICE, I was also active in NGOs that provide services for the blind.

I was president of the Society of the Blind in Malaysia from 2000 to 2010. I am also co-founder of the Malaysian Blind Muslims Association and served as president from 1989 to 2002, before I resigned for the benefit of younger leaders.

Now I am still active in the associations but perhaps to a lesser degree.

IN 2002 WE COMPLETED THE DRAFT FOR THE PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. I headed the technical working committee and the Act came into force in 2008.

It was a five-year process. It took quite a while because in 2006 the UN came out with the first international convention on rights of people with disabilities, so we have to fine-tune our proposed bill.

I was given the privilege to represent the country at the UN in 2006 when we negotiated for the convention.

MY EMPHASIS IS MORE TO PROMOTE THE RIGHT TO LITERACY AMONG THE BLIND. The rights for blind people to have equal access to reading materials in braille.

Be it for education or any other pursuit. Our focus is mainly on transcribing Islamic religious books as well as academic books.

We believe these two genres have been sidelined.

WITHIN ONE WEEK OF MY ARRIVAL IN THE UK IN 1991, I WAS GIVEN A COPY OF THE BIBLE IN BRAILLE FOR FREE. It gave me a challenge.

If Christian voluntary groups can work to give free Bibles, why can’t we Muslims provide free Quran? So that’s what I tried to do.

When I came back to Malaysia, we worked on a research project to produce the Quran in braille and now we have the capacity here at KL Braille Resources.

In order to finance the project, I launched what we called the Wakaf Al-Quran. We invite the public to sponsor any number of Quran as they wish and each set is priced at RM250.

With this sum, we finance the production of the Quran and distribute them to the needy.

I HAVE LOVED CHESS FROM A YOUNG AGE. I see chess not only as a competitive activity but for any disabled or blind person, it can also provide you with an opportunity to integrate with normal people.

EVEN THOUGH I AM BLIND, MY UNIVERSITY’S TEAM ACCEPTED ME JUST LIKE ANYBODY ELSE. I had taken part in an open tournament for selection for the university’s team.

I was the only blind person there. But I competed against sighted people and got third place.

They needed four people to fill the team. I also played in the UK’s chess league.

FOR THE 2009 AND 2010 PARALYMPICS, I WON GOLD FOR CHESS. Another achievement was in 2003 when I took part in the ASEAN Chess Championship for the Blind in Mumbai, India, and won second place.

Now I am still president of the National Chess Association for the Disabled and our members are busy preparing for the forthcoming paralympic games in Kuala Lumpur in September.

The current chess set produced by KL Braille is also being used exclusively for the paralympic games.

WHEN BLIND PEOPLE PLAY WITH SIGHTED PEOPLE, both players have to announce their move. The board is modified to allow for usage by blind people.

But we don’t compromise on the rules. There is no difference to the rules.

The black and white pieces, how a blind player can tell is based on touch.

BE IT VISION 2020 OR TN50, I wish to see that disability issues are not sidelined. The way I see it, disabled people should be given equal rights with other citizens.

They are not to be discriminated against or left out. They should be given all opportunities.

The movement to promote equal rights has been talked about since 1981.

IN THAT SENSE WE HAVE SEEN MUCH PROGRESS, but in some other areas, the progress is too slow. For example, we have difficulties with financial institutions.

Just to open bank accounts, have I always received grievances from my blind counterparts. They wanted to open bank accounts but are not allowed to by certain banks.

DISABILITY ISSUES ARE OFTEN NOT GIVEN ENOUGH COVERAGE. The media are prone to focus on issues that can trigger sympathy.

When you talk about disabled people, I think it is more worthwhile to talk about rights rather than individual challenges.

When doing a story, just ask yourself, who will benefit?

If it is just one or two people, how many stories do you want to do?

THE MEDIA RARELY HIGHLIGHT STORIES FROM THE OKU’S PERSPECTIVE. They will take a third person’s view.

If you want to talk about the problem of beggars, those selling tissues on the streets, just go and talk to them.

If authorities want to catch them for selling tissues, the first thing we must ask is, have we given them opportunities to make a living?

OPERATIONS TEND TO INCREASE WHEN THERE ARE BIG PROGRAMMES PLANNED. For example, if the prime minister is coming, they will be detained and put into trucks, sent off somewhere and asked to find their own way home.

If the breadwinner is arrested, how will those left at home survive?

Maybe the spouse will take the children to go out and beg.

WHEN THERE ARE NO JOB OPPORTUNITIES, what other choice do they have, at a time when even healthy able-bodied people are finding it difficult to find jobs?

What do you expect?

MALAYSIANS ARE VERY CARING. I don’t dispute that. But when it comes to giving disabled people their rights to lead independent lives, that’s when the problem starts.

For example, when you want to ride the LRT, the public is very caring. I don’t think we have any big problem anymore. The awareness is there.

But do you know that for people using wheelchairs, to have access, is it still very difficult? That is their right.

BEING BLIND IS NOTHING TO BE SHY ABOUT. As a matter of fact, we want to be treated just like any other ordinary people.

People often call us “golongan istimewa” or “kelainan upaya” (differently abled).

The term “orang kurang upaya” (disabled) shows that we have a disability but we are not pampered.

TREAT ME JUST LIKE ANY OTHER OF YOUR FRIENDS. If you can joke with and tease them, do the same to us.

What is the difference? We are the same. Just that it has been fated that we lost one of our senses.

VOX People

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